The J-School Workout

Kings Men

Do you constantly find yourself out of breath when interviewing someone? Are your arms fatigued after you finally put the camera down? Do you dread walking across campus with a tripod?

Well, my out-of-shape journalism friends, fear no more. There is finally a way to mold your gray, mushy body into the build of a young Cronkite: the J-School Workout.

“But Ben, what is the J-School workout?”

I’m glad you asked. The J-School workout is a set of plyometric exercises designed to tighten up your bod while doing everyday, journalism related things.

The Camera Kit Curl

  • Check out a camera kit from downstairs
  • Do a set of curls from your legs to a 90 degree angle (the angle that looks like an uppercase “L”)
  • Do a set of curls from the 90 degree angle to the top of your chest
  • Do a final set of curls from your legs to the top of your chest

Note: If you want quicker results, upgrade to a heavier kit– just lie and say you are a doctoral student or something to get it

Tripod High Knees

  • Check out a tripod
  • Hold it above your head and start doing high-knees
  • Pretty self-explanatory

Note: Start alternating between dipping the tripod behind your head and in front of your face to develop those rippling triceps that are oh so important for journalism students

The Pack Mule

  • Go to every single place on campus where you can check something out (Journalism Library, Info Desk, etc.)
  • Strategically hang everything from your body
  • Start walking up and down the steps of Gannett 88

Note: Oats are a nutritious part of any journalist’s diet

After these exercises are mastered, you will be ready to move on to J-School Workout: Capstone. Check back to see when this workout is published. Until then, go hard for the written word.

Music Major Work Load

If you’ve ever been to a Mizzou football game, then you’ve heard the marching band. For the marchers that are music majors, the songs don’t end with football season. J2150’s Ben Brown shows us that music never really stops for these students.

03/10/15                                                 MUSIC0310                                           Ben Brown


MUSIC0310                                              TRT 1:44                                              SOC


MUSIC0310                                              TRT 0:03                                              OC:“what we want to do.”


…our new Director of Athletics: Mack Rhoades”

 

Nobody ever has trouble hearing the band. But seeing all the work that these musicians put in? That’s a little tougher.

In addition to general education requirements, music majors like Grant Flakne participate in multiple ensembles and music theory classes.

“…a lot of things with different instruments. So I will run from one instrument to the next, and carry three instruments so I can do three classes back to back, and maybe make it home in between. “

           

During his final semester, he will take what he has learned and student-teach at a local school.

“Um, an average course load hour-wise is eighteen—and that’s average for us. Yeah before that, leading up to our professional semester we have to take multiple years of theory, multiple years of ear training and singing. And we have to take courses to learn how to play all the band instruments all the orchestra instruments…so yeah.”

“Wind ensemble, tuba euphonium ensemble, I’m in, oh, lab band. There are times that’s just like, ‘Man I’m doing all of this just to be a teacher.” But then again it’s like, ‘Yeah I’m doing all of this to be a teacher.’ Like, it’s kind of cool. It’s all about perspective really. You work hard every day, but it’s all, well for graduating, but you really want to get out and just teach. Like that’s just what we want to do.”

 

“Grant, who we talked to at the beginning of the story, said he was “fluent on six instruments,” and that he could play about 15 or 16. A very impressive and talented group of students. Ben Brown, J2150 (figurative).”

A Helpful Guide to Jump Cuts

Jump cuts: the bane of journalists everywhere

We spend all day in class Friday talking about jump cuts and how to avoid them. I thought I knew what jump cuts were, but it turns out I only knew a few examples. I’ve compiled a list here to help other journalists out there identify the different kinds of jump cuts. It would not be a bad idea to print this list off to reference while in the field. This list is not comprehensive, but it should serve as a pretty good place to start.

The Basic List of Jump Cuts

  • If you shoot a person from one side, then shoot them from the other
  • If the person you are interviewing doesn’t leave the frame in B-Roll before you cut back to their interview
  • If you are walking, and you try to get out of someone else’s way, but they try to get out of your way, and you both end up doing this awkward dance thing so as to avoid bumping into each other
  • If the background shifts with the same subject in front of it
  • If you meet your girlfriend’s father but give him a weak handshake
  • If your subject moves location without a transition
  • If you pronounce gif with a hard “g”
  • If you leap while crafting
  • If you chew with your mouth open
  • If the camera rotates so much that it would be able to see itself in the previous shot
  • If Punxsutawney Phil sees his shadow
  • If you are thinking about ordering an appetizer for yourself, then your friend, Cassie, says that it would be fun if everyone just went in on the App-Sampler to split because it is “a better value.” Then, like, five minutes after it shows up, she eats all of the mozzarella sticks.
  • If your eye is twitching, and you can feel it twitching, but people can’t see it

Journalists are discovering more and more jump cuts every day. If you are a journalist and discover a new jump cut, I encourage you to message me, and I will add it to the list.

Learning By Teaching

Music major Tim O’Sullivan is a sophomore in the University of Missouri’s School of Music. He is normally taught by world-renowned instructors. However, the conductors in his Tuesday morning ensemble are still learning their craft.

O’SULLIVAN: It’s just really cool to see my peers and, like, their personalities on a podium. You’re under the microscope; it’s kind of cool, like, you’re on the podium, you’re supposed to be directing all, whatever, 34 people that are in there. And you’re running a basic tune, it’s just really cool to see how they do and you also take into account, take it into your own learning, and try and prepare yourself for next year– whenever that comes around.

Being in it for their second year, they’ve watched a lot of previous people before them. It’s (the class) really considered kind of a hidden gem of music ed. You’re in front of an ensemble; you’re working with them; you’re doing things that you’re going to be doing every day. The upperclassmen, the second year people in there, they all are upper level music education majors. So this is their first real time– they get assigned a song at the beginning of the semester. They get about 20 minutes each time they’re up. They just work on their conducting patterns, and their rehearsal techniques, and all that kind of stuff.

The Lens Cap Was On, Part 2: The Struggle Continues

I can now somewhat operate a camera. Somewhat. Given enough time, and a patient subject, I can actually generate some pretty acceptable photos. Maybe I am cut out for this whole journalism thing.

*Goes to class Friday morning*

*Checks out video camera and tripod*

*Snaps back to reality*

Much like when I first started operating the DSLR camera, I figured it would be easy because I had recorded video before– on my phone. “Oh there’s not much to it,” I foolishly thought. “You just point and shoot.”

How wrong I was.

After five minutes of rotating the camera, I finally found the power button (For those who don’t know, it is the button directly under the word POWER.) I flipped out the screen and was ready to capture the world around me…

…a slightly green world. Why was everything green? Is everyone sick? I heard that some sort of bug was getting passed around. It turns out that you have to white balance the camera. In J2000, we talked about white balancing, so I was a little apprehensive about doing it because I didn’t oppress anyone, but my classmates soon informed me that I was, to use their phrasing, “wrong.” Whether it was racist or not, the camera white balanced, and I was ready to capture video. All I needed was my tripod.

“Hey you know what would be fun? If we design the top of this thing like a Rubik’s Cube.” -Inventors of the Tripod

And I thought I felt dumb looking for the On switch for the camera… I went through quite the emotional arc trying to work that thing:

R.I.P. Chris Farley

Frustration was mounting; I could feel the rage building inside of me. But luckily my classmate, Charlie, saved the day with his advice: “It goes in the other way.

I was finally ready to go. Once I started filming, I felt the familiar sting of my lack of ability. It was actually a lot like taking photos– except this time the evidence of my mediocrity were minute-long video clips instead of single photos.

Tuba? Or Not Tuba?

Music major Tim O’Sullivan has a busy schedule. He starts every day with an 8 a.m. class and is taking 19 credit hours this semester. Despite his grueling schedule, the sophomore makes time for one more ensemble on Friday afternoons.

*I have had so much trouble uploading this thing. At first it didn’t, then it uploaded with an extra 7 minutes of nothing, then it didn’t again, then it cut off the last 10 seconds, then it cut off the last 30 seconds, now it has the extra 7 minutes again. I finally just gave in and decided that this would be as good as it gets– at least the whole slideshow is on there and at the beginning.

Interviewing Strangers: The Thought Process

“I know how to talk to people, but I’ve never really recorded myself doing it. But it’s probably not that different, right?”

-Me after we were assigned to go interview strangers with recorders

Spoiler alert: It is different.

First off, in all of my previous conversations I’ve never had to wear headphones to hear the person’s voice. When I first went out and interviewed students in the J-School, I didn’t have any headphones with me, so I wasn’t able to monitor how the person’s voice was picked up by the recorder. I just looked at the bars on the display and hoped that they were at the appropriate levels.

After I conducted the first interview and located some headphones, I listened to what it sounded like. “Okay,” I thought. “This sounds good. Recording audio isn’t so ha– wait. Why does it sound like that?” It sounded like the recorded voice was jumping from ear to ear. It was actually messing with my balance; I thought I might fall over if I kept listening to it.

It turns out that I talk a lot with my hands. And that, coupled with walking around an office and my inexperience with microphone stability, made for very shaky audio. It was really quiet where we were, so the voices were still picked up clearly, but the balance was completely wrong.

Actually, it was almost like the audio was picked up too well. It sounded like we were speaking into a vacuum. I needed to record something that I could play underneath the interview track to give our voices a little texture. But where could I go to find this elusive audio?

The men’s bathroom.

It was quiet, but with the buzz of the vents echoing throughout the porcelain palace, it was the perfect place to get some ambient sound. So I walked in, checked my surroundings, then sat in the stall for one minute and recorded that peaceful buzzing.

Don’t worry; I washed my hands before I left.

Five Degrees of Tim

Tim O'Sullivan prepares to practice in 204 Loeb Hall. O'Sullivan is practicing pieces that require both an F and C tuba for University Wind Ensemble.

Music major Tim O’Sullivan prepares to practice in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. Practice space can be tough to come by for music majors, but O’Sullivan found room 204 unoccupied while the University Philharmonic Orchestra practiced just feet away.

Tim O'Sullivan prepares his warm up materials in Loeb Hall, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. O'Sullivan has to practice both F and C tuba for an upcoming University Wind Ensemble concert.

Music major Tim O’Sullivan prepares his warm up materials in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. O’Sullivan has to practice both F and C tuba for a University Wind Ensemble concert on Monday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m. at the Missouri Theatre.

Tim O'Sullivan practices his solo in Loeb Hall, Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. O'Sullivan will be performing at Missouri Theatre with the University Wind Ensemble, which will have the first of its two spring concerts on Monday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m.

Music major Tim O’Sullivan practices his solo in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. O’Sullivan will be performing at the Missouri Theatre with the University Wind Ensemble, which will have the first of its two spring concerts on Monday, Feb. 23 at 7:30 p.m.

Tim O'Sullivan plays an etude at Loeb Hall in Columbia, Mo. on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. In addition to practicing two tubas for the University Wind Ensemble, O'Sullivan practiced piano at Mark Twain Residence Hall earlier in the day for class.

Music major Tim O’Sullivan plays an etude at Loeb Hall in Columbia, Mo. on Tuesday, Feb. 17, 2015. In addition to practicing two tubas for the University Wind Ensemble, O’Sullivan practiced piano at Mark Twain Residence Hall earlier in the day for class.

Music major Tim O'Sullivan's fingers dance across the valves of his tuba in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Feb. 17, 2015. In addition to his own tuba, O'Sullivan leases an additional F tuba from his instructor, Dr. Angelo Manzo.

Music major Tim O’Sullivan’s fingers dance across the valves of his tuba in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Feb. 17, 2015. In addition to his own Bb tuba, O’Sullivan leases an F and C tuba from his instructor, Dr. Angelo Manzo.

BONUS

Music major Tim O'Sullivan suppresses a sneeze in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Feb. 17, 2015. It is cold outside, and according to O'Sullivan, "Everyone is getting sick; now they are getting me sick."

Music major Tim O’Sullivan suppresses a sneeze in Loeb Hall, Columbia, Mo. on Feb. 17, 2015. It is cold outside, and according to O’Sullivan, “Everyone is getting sick; now they are getting me sick.”